Nash Bass Guitars, UK, Jazz, Precision, Mustang Relic, Aged, Nitro, 1960, 1970, 1950, P bass, USA Custom built, Bass Direct :: Warwick, london, Manchester, Birmingham, UK, US, EU

 


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Nash Bass Guitars on order;


  1. PB-63 - Alder body, Vintage White, Tort p/g, Rosewood f/b, Medium aged, Lollar p’ups - SOLD

  2. PB-63 - Alder body, 3 Tone Sunburst, Tort p/g, Rosewood f/b, Medium aged, Lollar p’ups - £1950

  3. PB/J-63 - Alder body, Fiesta Red, Tort p/g, Maple f/b, Jazz neck,  light aged, Lollar p’ups - £2050

  4. PB-63 - Alder body, Black, Black pearloid p/g, Rosewood f/b, light aged, Lollar p’ups - SOLD

  5. Mustang - Lefthanded - Alder body, Sonic Blue, 4 Ply Tort p/g, Maple f/b, light aged, Lollar p’ups - £2099

  6. PB-52 - Ash body, Butterscotch blonde, 1 Ply Black p/g, Maple f/b, light aged, Lollar p’ups - £1950

  7. Mustang - Alder body, Dakota Red, Matching headstock, 4 Ply Tort p/g, Rosewood f/b, light aged, Lollar p’ups - £1999

  8. JB-5 - Alder body, Black, BWB p/g, Maple f/b,  medium aged, Lollar p’ups - £2150

  9. JB-63 - Alder body, Aztec Gold, Matching headstock, 4 Ply Tort p/g, Rosewood f/b,  light aged, Aguilar 4J p’ups - £2150

  10. JB-63 - Alder body, Vintage White, Tort p/g, Rosewood f/b, medium aged, Lollar p’ups - £1999


  1. P Bass


  2. PB-52 50 - 53
  3. Ash or Alder body, Maple f/b, Lindy Frailin or DiMarzio p/ups, colour Butterscotch Blond, Black p/g.


Ash body in Butterscotch Blond. Maple Neck and white single-ply guard. Lollar or Duncan Pickups.




  1. PB-55 54 - 56
  2. Ash or Alder body, Maple f/b,  Lindy Frailin or DiMarzio p/ups, colours 2T sunburst, Black, Mark Kay White, White p/g.


Ash or Alder body in all colours. Maple Neck and white single-ply guard. Lollar or Duncan Pickups




  1. PB-57 57 - 59
  2. Ash or Alder body, Maple f/b,  Lollar , Lindy Frailin or DiMarzio p/ups, all colours available, Gold anodised p/g.


Available in either alder or ash bodies and with maple necks. Default pickups are Lollar Model Ps, but other pickups are available as well. Necks have medium large frets, a 10 radius on the fretboard and available in medium C only. Gold anodised guard is standard.



  1. PB-63 60 - 69, £1899

  2. Ash or Alder body, Rosewood f/b,  Lollar , Lindy Frailin or DiMarzio p/ups, available in all colours, 3 piece white or Tort p/g.

Available in either alder or ash bodies and with rosewood necks. Default pickups are Lollar Model Ps, but other pickups are available as well. Necks have medium large frets, a 10 radius on the fretboard and available in medium C only. 3 ply mint, tort or white guards available.




  1. Jazz Bass

  2. JB-63 60 - 69
  3. Ash or Alder body, Rosewood f/b,  Lindy Frailin or DiMarzio p/ups, all colours available, 3 piece white,3 piece Black or Tort p/g


Available in either alder or ash bodies and with maple or rosewood necks. Default pickups are Lollar Model Ps, but other pickups are available as well. Necks have medium large frets, a 10 radius on the fretboard and available in medium C only.





  1. 73 - 79

  2. Ash or Alder body, Maple f/b,  Lollar, Lindy Frailin or DiMarzio p/ups, all colours available, 3 piece white,3 piece Black or Tort p/g



  3. JB-72 72 with blocks and binding inlays
  4. Ash or Alder body, Maple or Rosewood f/b, all colours available, Lollar , Lindy Frailin or DiMarzio p'ups, 3 piece black or white p/g.


Available in either alder or ash bodies and with maple or rosewood necks. Default pickups are Lollar , DiMarzio Model Ps, but other pickups are available as well. Necks have medium large frets, a 10 radius on the fretboard and available in medium C only.





  1. Tele Bass

  2. TB-68 67 - 70, Ash or Alder body, Maple or Rosewood f/b, all colours available, Lollar, Lindy or DiMarzio p'ups, 3 piece white p/g


Slab bodies in either ash or alder in all colours, necks in either maple or rosewood. Single coil vintage type pickup. 3 ply white, mint, tort or black guards (may we suggest adding a JPickup and stacked knobs).



Mustang Bass - MB63

Available in all standard colours, ash, alder bodies and Lollar pickups





Colour options







Nash guitars was started in 2001. Bill Nash, the one most to blame was raised in Los Angeles in and around the music industry. Played in bands, used to make his own guitars, customise things, ruin things and did much of what you would imagine goes on it the formative years of a someday guitar builder, blah, blah, boring. At the writing of this text, the company has grown to include two facilities, 8 or 9 employees and is truly a team effort. We understand that we are the largest independent maker of aged guitars in the industry. Most of the day to day running of and administration work is done or overseen by Mrs. Nashguitars as Bill is really best left to the creative side of things where he will not mess up the business end (anymore). He would have been fired long ago, but he is the only one who knows certain secrets used in the ageing of the guitars. All employees are guitar players. We will not ship a guitar or bass that we ourselves would not want to own or play.

I'd rather buy a REAL Fender than some parts-o-caster made by Nash.

It may be a bit of a strange concept, but open your mind and try and forget everything you know and feel about guitars. Now, here is a concept - Leo Fender left his company in 1964. You know most of this history, but now look at it from a MFG standpoint and what you consider a real Fender guitar. Those factories are all gone. Fender is dead, most of the people that put those guitars together are long gone. Virtually every facet of making a Fender guitar is different, completely different, than it was back in Leo's days.  So what we have is something called a Fender Stratocaster that other than the shape of the body and headstock and some layout shares almost nothing with the "real" Fender Stratocaster as it was designed and made in the early days. Think of it this way - Ford motor Company makes a new Mustang that is a killer little car that does have an overall vibe from its namesake from the 60s, but it is in no way a 64 Mustang.

This brings me to my point. No one has made a real Fender guitar since 1964. FMIC, may hold copyrights and trademarks to some names and designs, but they certainly do not make real Fender guitars as Ford does not make a real Mustang any more. Now start thinking about all those crappy cars that share names with some really great cars and it becomes a real funny thing to think about. A 2006 Chevy Impala has as much to do with a 1960 Chevy Impala as does a Moped. Now, when someone buys a Made in Mexico Fender Telecaster, is it really a Fender Telecaster or is it as much a Fender Telecaster as a 2007 Ford Mustang is a FORD MUSTANG? Could you consider that FMIC is actually making Fender copies, and sometimes not very well? Some of the Fender reissues made by the Custom Shop are much more on target, however they are still hobbled by many factors, such as paint, pickups, hardware and other parts that are still made from more modern designs or elements.

So, for many people who buy our guitars, we put something in their hands something that is better to their liking - and may just do Leo a bit more justice. I hope so. Look at a thing for only what it is. Right here right now.

FYI, I own several post 64 Fenders myself so do not think I am trashing them. I do buy them with different expectations than I did years ago. I know they are copies and or replicas. My favorites are the MIJ reissues. Should I think just because FMIC holds the control of the name, that a guitar made in Japan, Mexico or China is actually a REAL Fender?

Now, so you do not think I am trashing Fender specifically, I feel that there are many makers that have put out guitars with their company name, model name and logos that share little with the "original" guitars. Gretsch comes to mind easily as they make a fantastic line of reissues, however except for the USA custom shop stuff, all of them are made in the orient. I think of these as copies commissioned for the holder of the trade name and though they may look and sound much like their vintage brothers, they are certainly a whole different instrument. Is a current Hamer Sunburst anywhere near the guitar that was the 1981 Hamer Sunburst? I think Rickenbacker is the only guitar maker from the old days that could actually claim that they are much the same as they once were, as they have not been bought, sold, moved, re-tooled, commissioned Asian factories and all the other things most makers have done. Gibson falls in a mid point as they certainly have been bought and sold many times and moved factories etc, but the end product in most cases has come full circle and in my opinion they make guitars as good if not better than they did in the 50s. This of course depends on model as there are certainly examples of questionable guitars in their line. My only complaint is that the guitars generally need a complete fret dressing and some other mods when they come out of the factory.

Bottom line is that there are many Fender inspired guitar builders who make guitars that are better than the ones either made or commissioned by FMIC. I may or not be one of them, but I can say that Callaham, Anderson, Suhr, Grosch and several others would certainly be in this category.

Another thing to consider - what percentage of the parts used on a "real" Fender are made by them? I think you would be surprised at the answer.

The big legal discussion - who gets sued, who owns what etc.

This is the area that I am so often amazed about when I read some of the postings. Why anyone has taken the time to speculate and or debate an area that they have absolutely no information about is a mystery to me. This is a complex subject that would take many pages to go into. FMIC owns trademarks including the word "Relic", which is why I never use it. Other than that, anything I say has the possibility of more negative than positive impact - and really who cares about this.

Where do the bodies and necks come from?

I use several OEM suppliers that do not do much business with the public. They are in the USA, however I will not name them. This I do for a couple reasons. I once had a supplier stop selling to me once they were named. Their biggest customer for raw parts is FMIC and they felt some pressure to make a decision about selling me or FMIC. Though I was doing some respectable numbers with them, certainly I will never come close to spending what FMIC does, so I totally understood. But I learned a valuable lesson there and it has nothing to do with not wanting the public to know. The other reason is that they generally do not want to deal with retail sales (like selling one neck at a time to a private individual) so in most cases, these companies would prefer to not be mentioned.

I will certainly use some of the obvious retail neck and body makers to fill in a piece here and there, but not more than a couple bodies or necks a year - it does not fit our business model. We build about 100 guitars a month so these OEM suppliers ship standing orders to us every 4-8 weeks, depending on the product - certainly not a service that any of the retail parts companies is set up to do. This allows both the supplier and the builder to anticipate and control work loads, product flow and man hours. In the past as we were building the business and the numbers were not so steady, we did use more obvious retail makers often, so there will be Nash guitars out there with necks and bodies with those markings.

Is it true that (....insert name of famous guitar player here.....) uses a Nash, and why is this information not publicised - especially by Nash who is obviously a money grubbing opportunist - as it would benefit his sales.

The answer is that every famous guitarist dead or alive, even ones who died before I was born, are Nash owners except Stevie Ray Vaughn as he overplayed and thus I did not let him have one.

Actually the answer is complex. There are countless big name,, medium name and otherwise famous people using Nashes. It is up to them to decide who to make that information known to. I rarely speak with them directly as this type of business is usually run through a dealer or the guitar tech that takes care of them. Some of them use my guitars as it is just stupid to bring a 50-100K guitar out on the road every night so if they can get something that does the job, keeps the vibe, but is replaceable for a small price, it makes sense. Many are endorsees of bigger companies and those arrangements may be jeopardised by publicity. Keep in mind that most of these guys have so many guitars that in some ways, it really is not that impressive if they have a couple of mine. I am sure they have guitars both better and worse than mine in the stable. That being said, I am honored that many of my heroes have become clients. I will only say that if I tune into my local classic rock station, no more than a few minutes will go by before I hear a band that includes a client. 

 


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